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  1. Low Calories Sportsdrink (1000 ml) bottle
    Low Calories Sportsdrink (1000 ml) bottle
    1000ml
    €14.90
    (€14.90 / 1 L)
    Incl. 7% VAT, excl. Shipping Cost
  2. Vitamin B Bioactive (150 Kapseln)
    Vitamin B Bioactive (150 Capsules)
    €10.99
    (€83.83 / 1 KG)
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  3. Multivitamin (130 Kapseln)
    Multivitamin (130 capsules)
    €14.90
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  4. Immufuel? (30 Ampullen)
    Immufuel® (30 Ampules)
    30 Ampullen à 25ml
    €39.90
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Vitamin B1 - For the central nervous system

Vitamin B1, or thiamine, is a vitamin from the B complex and belongs to the group of water-soluble vitamins. Its most important feature is its effect on the central nervous system. There it is responsible for well-functioning interactions between the brain, nerves and muscles. On the whole so for the physical and mental performance. Another important role is played by this vitamin in the metabolism: it is involved in the production of energy from food and has an influence on the synthesis of fatty acids. Thus, without vitamin B1 in the body, the digestive power would be disturbed, the heart could not work properly and the formation of red blood cells would be reduced. Athletes use this vitamin as anabolic vitamin, because it has an analgesic and anti-inflammatory effect. An average adult needs 1.0 - 1.6 milligrams of vitamin B1 a day. In pregnant women or athletes the need is slightly increased. Especially pork, liver and poultry are rich in vitamin B1 and make excellent natural sources. But even potatoes, wholemeal flour or dairy products have a high proportion. However, as vitamin B1 is water-soluble, care should be taken that the food is prepared as gently as possible. When cooking, the vitamin B1 contained in the food, for example, goes into the cooking water and is poured away in most cases. Oxygen or heat also has a negative impact on this vitamin and can destroy it. Such factors can be beneficial for the occurrence of a vitamin B1 deficiency and the consequences can be serious. In addition to fatigue, nervousness or migraine, depression can also occur. Hair loss and the onset of acne provide further signs of vitamin B1 deficiency. In case of severe deficiencies, cardiac insufficiency, mental confusion and memory weakness may even occur. These symptoms are compounded by a poor diet, especially if too many refined foods such as white flour or sugar are consumed. Excessive alcohol consumption also contributes to this.